SaVoa Welcomes Its First Turkish Voice: Mehmet Onur


In a world… Full of voices… But only one choice…
Since the provision of voice services is not reliant on geographical location, it is becoming more common for the artist and client to work remotely. Having heard an artist’s demo, the client may already be convinced that the voice on the demo is the best match for job, but how can he be sure that the required audio will be professionally performed, reliably delivered, and meeting standards of excellence in sound quality? These are legitimate concerns shared by SaVoa (the Society of Accredited Voice Over Artists) which has developed a series of standards which aim to demonstrate that an accredited voice artist meets or exceeds established standards for vocal delivery (performance and technique) and technical delivery (audio quality and technique).
Indeed, accreditation by SaVoa is recognition of a voice over artist’s ability to provide vocally and technically proficient broadcast-quality voice over services and to conduct business in a manner that enhances the profession as a whole.
Just as we provide voice overs to clients internationally, so too is SaVoa an international organisation, with members all over the world. However since accreditation was only available in English, French, Spanish and German the organisation has grown slowly in countries where these are not the native language.
While I am proud to have been the first member of SaVoa based in Turkey, I am more excited today to be able to welcome Mehmet Onur as the first Turkish voice artist to be accredited.
Mehmet’s accreditation opens a new door for SaVoa, and now all Turkish voice artists have the opportunity to put themselves forward. They too can apply to attain individual accreditation through peer review, thereby promoting quality assurance in the voice over community. This is not only good for clients, but also provides new opportunities for raising awareness of the industry and its development…
It would be fair to say that since SaVoa is keen to develop a trustworthy and reliable standard, the addition of a new language for accreditation was not a decision taken lightly. Keen to develop SaVoa in Turkey I first brought this up in early 2010, and this further endorses Mehmet’s milestone achievement.
When we met with Dave Courvoisier, a SaVoa Advisory Board member, at VOICE 2010, he had this to say about the organisation (listen to and read the full interview here):
I wasn’t a founding member, but I quickly latched onto this movement because I really believe it’s important and typically how I relate that is to people who are teachers, or engineers, or accountants, or even hairdressers are certified to ply their trade. But not voice overs – and by way, not journalists either, which I think is a real downside. I think there should be a certification process, or at least a standard of excellence that people aspire to, and so that’s what SaVoa’s about. It’s to set that standard and to raise the industry level of legitimacy. I just think in general it kind of knocks everybody up the side of the head, and says, “Hey, you know, do you want to be part of a of a better standard”, and “Do you want to be considered a professional?”, and “Here’s how you can do it and be part of our movement”. It’s not a union, and agents shouldn’t be scared by it. It’s just a guild.
With the membership of SaVoa in Turkey sudenly doubled, I look forward to working with Mehmet to grow its presence here, and to the added confidence that as one British, and one Turkish voice over there is currently “In a world… Full of voices… But only one choice…” a SaVoa accredited choice of each here!
Congratulations Mehmet Onur!

In a world… Full of voices… But only one choice…

Since the provision of voice services is not reliant on geographical location, it is becoming more common for the artist and client to work remotely. Having heard an artist’s demo, the client may already be convinced that the voice on the demo is the best match for job, but how can he be sure that the required audio will be professionally performed, reliably delivered, and meeting standards of excellence in sound quality? These are legitimate concerns shared by SaVoa (the Society of Accredited Voice Over Artists) which has developed a series of standards which aim to demonstrate that an accredited voice artist meets or exceeds established standards for vocal delivery (performance and technique) and technical delivery (audio quality and technique).

Mehmet Onur

Mehmet Onur

Indeed, accreditation by SaVoa is recognition of a voice over artist’s ability to provide vocally and technically proficient broadcast-quality voice over services and to conduct business in a manner that enhances the profession as a whole.

Just as we provide voice overs to clients internationally, so too is SaVoa an international organisation, with members all over the world. However since accreditation was only available in English, French, Spanish and German the organisation has grown slowly in countries where these are not the native language.

While I am proud to have been the first member of SaVoa based in Turkey, I am more excited today to be able to welcome Mehmet Onur as the first Turkish voice artist to be accredited.

Mehmet’s accreditation opens a new door for SaVoa, and now all Turkish voice artists have the opportunity to put themselves forward. They too can apply to attain individual accreditation through peer review, thereby promoting quality assurance in the voice over community. This is not only good for clients, but also provides new opportunities for raising awareness of the industry and its development…

It would be fair to say that since SaVoa is keen to develop a trustworthy and reliable standard, the addition of a new language for accreditation was not a decision taken lightly. Although Mehmet Onur’s ability and experience clearly marked him as a candidate member, it was still necessary for him to go through the accreditation process. Keen to develop SaVoa in Turkey I first brought this up in early 2010, and this further endorses Mehmet’s milestone achievement.

When we met with Dave Courvoisier, a SaVoa Advisory Board member, at VOICE 2010, he had this to say about the organisation (listen to and read the full interview here):

I wasn’t a founding member, but I quickly latched onto this movement because I really believe it’s important and typically how I relate that is to people who are teachers, or engineers, or accountants, or even hairdressers are certified to ply their trade. But not voice overs – and by way, not journalists either, which I think is a real downside. I think there should be a certification process, or at least a standard of excellence that people aspire to, and so that’s what SaVoa’s about. It’s to set that standard and to raise the industry level of legitimacy. I just think in general it kind of knocks everybody up the side of the head, and says, “Hey, you know, do you want to be part of a of a better standard”, and “Do you want to be considered a professional?”, and “Here’s how you can do it and be part of our movement”. It’s not a union, and agents shouldn’t be scared by it. It’s just a guild.

With the membership of SaVoa in Turkey sudenly doubled, I look forward to working with Mehmet to grow its presence here, and to the added confidence that as one British, and one Turkish voice over there is currently “In a world… Full of voices… But only one choice…” a SaVoa accredited choice of each here!

Congratulations Mehmet Onur!

Links: Mehmet Onur

Mehmet Onur (Personal website)

Press Release: Media Cat (Translate)

Press Release: Haber34 (Translate)

Press Release: Haber Türk (Translate)

Press Release: Süper Poligon (Translate)

Press Release: Taraf (Translate)

Links: SaVoa

SaVoa – The Society of Accredited Voice Over Artists

Please click on image to view video

SaVoa: Please click on image to view video

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